Archive for Communication

The wired water cooler is no substitute for face time

It Isn’t So Lonely Around the Water Cooler

Working virtually from home, at least part of the time, has become the norm in many companies. The more senior you are the more likely you have the authority to decide when and where you work.

Working virtually no doubt has its benefits: no long commute on the train, flexible hours, problem solving in your pajamas.

It’s gotten so prevalent that companies don’t even have offices for a lot of their staff and do “hoteling.” You call ahead and reserve an office when you absolutely must be there.

So, what’s wrong with this picture?

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culture of communication employee engagement

Creating a Culture of Communication

When companies fail, it may be because they didn’t provide products or services that met a market need. Or, they were mis-managed. But the primary culprit is often poor communication.

No matter what your work environment or your industry, if communication with employees is broken, you will never realize your corporate vision. What’s essential to success is creating a culture of communication. Read More→

Millenials financial advice

Millennials Want Financial Advice – on Their Terms

It’s impossible to ignore millennials, the generation born between 1980 and 2000. They are the largest generation in U.S. history, numbering nearly 80 million.

And, although they don’t have significant assets today, it’s projected millennials will control $7 trillion in liquid assets by 2020 and likely inherit more than $40 trillion from their parents and grandparents.

Over the last year we have studied millennials; reviewed the research, interviewed them (including financial advisors who are millennials) and considered their impact on our industry. Read More→

Blogs vs. Term Papers and Essays – A Growing Trend?

"They will write blogs, not term papers"

They will write blogs, not term papers

The words “term paper” strike fear into the hearts of students, followed closely by “essay.”  I remember those dark days of burning the candle to finish a term paper in college. It usually wasn’t fun if you had been assigned a specific topic.

I was lucky that my English professor, Dr. Edward Chalfant, didn’t require term papers, but simply asked us to write what we felt about an American novel or a Shakespearean play.

He was ahead of his time and foretold the coming of the blog, an informal style of writing that can enable a more personal connection between students and professors and between companies and customers in the business world.

Blogging for Grades

The New York Times weighed in on this topic recently, quoting educators who advocate trashing the old-fashioned term paper and those who still preach that students need the discipline of the format: make a point, defend it, repeat it. Read More→