Archive for Elevator Speech

How Can You Create Your Roll Off Your Tongue Elevator Pitch?

This is not the final word on elevator pitches, just a summary of Pat Weber’s key points from our previous interviews.  Pat http://www.prostrategies.com, wants to assure introverts in particular that an elevator pitch is just an initial conversation. What we know about these first talks is that it’s just not necessary to go deep. She is aware that both introverts and extroverts alike might have a tongue-tying elevator pitch for different reasons. I asked her therefore to summarize what she thinks would work for both styles to create an easy to speak elevator speech, which serves as an introduction. For my take on elevator speeches follow this link to where Pat interviewed me. To learn more about how Pat and I began our collaboration on LinkedIn, tune in to our discussion on Free Webinar Wednesdays: “Success Stories From the Trenches.”

"Patricia Weber"

Patricia Weber

[tweetmeme]When I am networking, I am who I am – an introvert with just so much energy.  I’m like a generator that needs to get refueled.  An introductory conversation is like that too. The elevator pitch is a easier when I just keep it short, focus on helping the other person understand clearly what I do and end it with something that will likely entice the person listening to want to know more. The conversation can continue later.

It’s really that easy. Planning is second nature to an introvert while speaking, speaking, speaking usually puts an extrovert in the zone. Either style can speak an elevator pitch fluidly like this:

Keep your pitch to around 100 words. As you hone it, write it out and chop, chop if necessary. That’s short.

Once you’ve honed a statement of what you do for a particular type client, focus on the benefit. You can get this by asking a few of your clients if you find yourself getting long winded. They’ll keep your focus on what you do, for who, to help with a problem.

Along with your name, offer something gives them more than your pitch. Direct them to your website or offer to help them so they want to know more.

My online friend Barbara Lopez is the Elevator Pitch Coach. That’s right, she coaches people with her process to help your introduction work in networking, at trade shows, and even on that elevator. Well she could “pitch” it that way but it wouldn’t get you to say, “Tell me more,” would it? Here is Barbara’s 30-second elevator introduction:

“When you give your networking commercial at events, or when someone asks you ‘what do you do?’, do you get nervous…or draw a blank?

I’m Barbara, The Elevator Pitch Coach with Brightfarm, and for over 5 years I’ve been helping professionals answer that question with high impact.  My clients love working with me, because I teach them a simple 4-step system for creating a winning self-introduction, insuring that they attract more clients in all of their networking efforts.

Don’t be nervous at your next networking event.  Share with me your toughest networking challenge, and I’ll give you a solution you can use right away.”

Short. Got it. Just 104 words.

What she helps whom with. You know all of it don’t you? Got it.

Finally is there a statement that has you wanting to learn more? Got it.

Introductions that pull people toward you don’t have to go on and on. Regardless of introvert or extrovert, like a generator, you can refuel the first conversation with someone when you get that “Tell me more,” comment from them. Either an introvert or extrovert will be happy for that! We introverts can go deeper and extroverts can talk at length.

Leading and inspiring introverts in business with coaching, training and eBooks, to live genuinely for the most success and fun. Business Coach for Introverts and Shy, Patricia Weber.  I think that sums it up succinctly.  But we’re not stopping here.

We want to collect good, memorable elevator pitches. You know the kind you hear when you are at a networking group where the facilitator goes around the room in some fashion asking each person for their introduction Then you hear one or two that have you say to yourself, “I really want to know more about that person.”

Would you leave yours in the comments below? I’m sure there are enough around that will allow us to compile them into a public report for your further learning.

An Elevator Pitch Can Kill You from the Top Floor Down

In this post with Pat Weber* Business Sales Coach for Introverts and Shy, Pat answers more of my questions about what makes for a good and bad elevator pitch.  Collaborating with Pat on this project has been a dream — and to quote Humphrey Bogart’s famous last line from Casablanca, “… I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.”  For my take on elevator speeches follow this link to where Pat interviewed me. To learn more about how Pat and I began our collaboration on LinkedIn, tune in to our discussion on Free Webinar Wednesdays: “Success Stories From the Trenches.”

"Patricia Weber"

Patricia Weber

Do some pitches warrant a full explanation?

[tweetmeme]It’s annoying when people say, “Because what I do is somewhat complicated, … ” and then they suggest it’s best to have a one-to –one meeting.

Hey buster. If YOU can’t explain it for me to understand before I buy it, what’s going to happen if I need help after you have my money?

Should a person start with his/her name?

Starting with the very unattractive, “Hi, my name is Wendy,” makes me feel like I’m at an AA meeting – yes I have attended a couple of those and I mean that with all respect. Your name, unless it’s Bill Gates, Oprah or the like is relatively unimportant in an introduction intended to get people’s attention. Start with a question, startling statistic or one problem you solve. When we meet people in meetings or events, they both bring in their minds the events of the day as well as get distracted by the entire goings on around them. Break their preoccupied thoughts.

If these pitches they all sound the same, how can I be a referral partner?

A BNI networking group is intended to extend your marketing reach by making your chapter members aware of what you do or offer so that they can be part of your sales team. While a few might be prospective clients you don’t want to pitch them the same way. Does it really make sense to make the same pitch to both of these audiences? Like would you pitch your boyfriend the way your pitch your father? Come on. Have a prepared and refined introduction, which appeals to the specificity of the audience.

What do you think about using titles in a pitch?

Don’t tell me your fancy title! I could give a hoot. Tell me what problems you solve and for what group of people. Really, which peaks your interest more, “I help people do a better job with saving and spending their money,” or, “I’m a financial planner.” What about, “I help employers hire better employees faster,” or “I’m in job placement.” I don’t know; maybe it’s just me. I want that elevator to stay in motion.

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*Leading and inspiring introverts in business with coaching, training and eBooks, to live genuinely for the most success and fun. Business Coach for Introverts and Shy, Patricia Weber.

Elevator Pitches Would Be Better if They Didn’t Make You Gag

Elevator pitches have gotten a bad rap because most aren’t very good.  Pat Weber* Business Coach for Introverts and Shy is a business colleague I met on LinkedIn.  It turns out we both have strong opinions about what I prefer to call a brand statement — because it is supposed to communicate in about 30 seconds the “what’s in it for me?”  I interviewed Pat for her ideas — her very strong ideas — about what drives her crazy about elevator pitches and what you can do to make yours rise to the occasion.  Here are her answers to my questions. To learn more about how Pat and I began our collaboration on LinkedIn, tune in to our discussion on Free Webinar Wednesdays: “Success Stories From the Trenches.”

"Patricia Weber"

Patricia Weber

Why do most of these pitches sound the same?

[tweetmeme]People always say the same thing in their introductions in meetings that go on week after week. I’ve worked with a couple of clients to tease out of them at least 6 or 7 variations for something fresh and interesting to listen to. Otherwise, listening can stop.

Because people put up with this silliness, it discourages creativity to create and speak something of real interest. I personally think the networking group BNI is one of the worst at encouraging this because, as far as I know, how to vary your pitch is never addressed in their training.

Is it just me, or do most pitches have the wrong focus?

This is where that verbal diarrhea needs something like Pepto Bismol. It’s “my company,” and “our products” and “we’re the best.” I mean who really cares? What the prospective client wants to hear is – what problems do you solve? How does that mean anything to me? The other stuff is fluff and only matters as the relationship deepens.

The worst elevator pitches are loaded with the words, “I, me, my, mine, ours.” I tested this once as educational leader of a local leads group. Before everyone started in a tiresome round robin of pitches, I asked everyone to stand. The directions were that as soon as anyone heard a pitch with “I, me, my, mine, ours,” they could tell the guilty party to sit down. It was like rapid fire all around the table. The point is the focus of many, or most elevator pitches is wrong.

Rarely do people talk about the problems they solve and instead run like a race horse out of it’s gate with, “we have blue widgets and a lot of people like red widgets,” ad nausea.  A listener has little interest in product features during an introductory pitch.  But the listener does want to know the type of problems solved or the benefits of a product or service.  Focus, focus, focus on answering “Just what does that mean for me?” for the prospective customer or referral partner.  This will help you to lead with problems solved or benefits of the features you want people to know about.

How can elevator pitches attract potential clients?

What if people would end their pitch with what Barbara Lopez. Elevator Pitch Coach, calls, Make Them Want More? Offer them a small experience what you do or have: a free sample, your blog address, something to give them a reason to want to talk further with you instead of ending things with, “And again my name is … yakkety yak.” Who cares!

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*Leading and inspiring introverts in business with coaching, training and eBooks, to live genuinely for the most success and fun. Business Coach for Introverts and Shy, Patricia Weber.

For my take on elevator speeches follow this link to where Pat interviewed me.